The Subsidization of University Tuition

 

Pascale Diverlus
ENG 4U

Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” He, and many others in history, recognized the importance of education and the impact it can have – not only on students, but also on the world. Unfortunately, due to high tuition fees, many are unable to gain a post-secondary education. University and college tuition has become a luxury available to only those who can afford it, however it is increasingly necessary. Post-secondary school tuition should be subsidized, because the current tuition fees make post-secondary education especially inaccessible to those in marginalized communities, further contributing to the poverty cycle. As well as this, astronomical student debts prevent many from attending college or university. Post-secondary education is a social service that is beneficial to all, therefore is should be made affordable to all.

The subsidization of university tuition would especially benefit those living in marginalized communities. Those in marginalized communities are unable to pay for university and from there a vicious poverty cycle ensues. Although high tuition fees affect all citizens, they prevent residents of marginalized communities from breaking away from the cycle of poverty. However, those with a college degree will earn, on average, 75 percent more than high school graduates in their lifetime.[1] Yet, tuition fees are at their highest. How can the impoverished be expected to defeat their obstacles in order to attend university? In a marginalized community such as areas in Detroit Michigan, the average income for a worker is $26,000 while the average university tuition in the United States is $19,300.[2] Rather than a resource, education has become a commodity for sale. By lowering tuition fees, it for would help to equalize opportunities those living below the poverty line may be able to attend and eventually break the cycle of poverty. The current tuition fees limit those less fortunate. The lowering of tuition fees would greatly benefit those living in marginalized communities.

Many are hesitant to embark on university because of the student debts that follow. In fact, two thirds of students who decide against enrolling in university say that student debt affected their decision. [3] Tuition is high as it is and with added interest, most are unable to fully pay off their student loans for many years after graduating. The debt from tuition fees not only affects the current students but also after the student graduates. Graduating students start their life in debt. Student loan obligations delay the post-education process for most graduates such as starting a family and purchasing a house. The debt of tuition fees also has an impact on students before they even graduate. Researchers have concluded that debt, even at low levels, “can have a detrimental impact on students’ experience of university.” [4] Evidently, tuition should be lowered due to the effect of student debt.

Education is a human right but the with current tuition fees, many are unable to afford the schooling. Post-secondary education should be subsidized because as of right now, it is inaccessible to those especially in marginalized areas and there is a large effect of having student debt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibiography

Cooke, Richard “Student Debt and its Relation to Student Mental Health.” Journal of Further and Higher Education Vol. 28, February 2004.

Davies, Peter “Knowing Where to Study? Fees, Bursaries, and Fair access.” Institute for Educational Policy Research and Institute for Access Studies, Staffordshire University, UK, February 2008

Day, Jennifer and Newburger, Eric. “The Big Payoff: Educational Attainment and Synthetic Estimates of Work-Life Earnings,” Special Studies, U.S. Bureau of the Census, July 2002. http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/acs-14.pdf


[1] Day, Jennifer and Newburger, Eric. “The Big Payoff: Educational Attainment and Synthetic Estimates of Work-Life Earnings,” Special Studies, U.S. Bureau of the Census, July 2002.

[2] U.S. Census Bureau: State and County QuickFacts. January 2012.

[3] Davies, Peter “Knowing Where to Study? Fees, Bursaries, and Fair access.” Institute for Educational Policy Research and Institute for Access Studies, Staffordshire University, UK, February 2008.

[4] Cooke, Richard “Student Debt and its Relation to Student Mental Health.” Journal of Further and Higher Education Vol. 28, February 2004.

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